Hawaii Kona Coffee

Hawaii Kona Coffee
Hawaii Kona Coffee
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Hawaii Kona Coffee

19.99

Hawaii Kona Coffee

100% Pure - Rare Luxury Coffee

The wonderful island of Hawaii is known for producing outstanding coffee. It's spectacular high elevation, constant cloud coverage and rich volcanic soil from Hualalai Volcano in the upland slopes of KONA create an ideal environment for harvesting this unique Hawaiian coffee bean.

Kona is regarding as an elite coffee, specifically heirloom typica arabica.  The term 100% pure Kona is regarded as an industry gold standard for distinguishing *blends* (coffee beans of mixed origin/type) and single origin pure batches.

Our 100% pure Kona comes directly from Hawaii and the magical slopes of Kona to produce world class, tantalisingly seductive cups of coffee.  Excellent as an espresso or Americano, 100% Kona coffees are vibrant and fresh with mild complexity and cocoa, honey sweetness and tart citric acidity. 

Our batch is 100% pure - and is bespoke artisan hand-roasted to order. 

SIZE: 100g

REE NEXT DAY DELIVERY

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Hawaii Kona Coffee

Coffee’s early decades in Hawai‘i were tumultuous as plantations combatted a scale insect, challenging weather conditions, and a dearth of workers caused by an exodus to California during the gold rush. In many areas, competition with sugar plantations for land and labor further stymied the early development of the Hawaiian coffee industry. During the middle of the 19th century, some success was found and a positive international reputation was built. Near the end of the century, a new variety from Guatemala, ‘Typica’, was introduced and proved to be a prolific producer relative to the Brazilian variety. Farmers quickly switched to it. At the end of the century, coffee prices crashed and coffee production suffered a steep decline on most of the islands. The region of Kona on Hawai‘i Island was the only place to maintain a successful coffee growing community. Throughout the 20th century, the viability of coffee production in Kona waxed and waned but it never completely disappeared. By the 1980s, sugarcane and pineapple, two major crops in Hawai‘i, were losing their dominance and the large companies that owned them began seeking alternative crops to plant. Coffee was a logical choice because of its suitability, local history, innovations in harvesting technology, and the burgeoning specialty coffee movement. These coffee farms, borne from crop diversification efforts, helped bring a resurgence of coffee cultivation throughout Hawai‘i. With the development of the Internet and the continued growth of specialty coffee, marketing coffee from individual estates became popular. Today, Hawai‘i’s coffee farms employ a diverse set of business models ranging from selling coffee cherry to complete seed-to-cup operations. Currently, coffee is grown on 5 Hawaiian Islands in 8 regions. The industry has never been healthier or more diverse. The myriad of varieties, innovations, and business models has created an exciting coffee industry unlike any other in the world.

One can select among hundreds of farms, several regions and many coffee varieties, often sold direct from the farm - each with distinctive farm practices, styles, and flavour profiles. Buyers can source green coffees direct from farms, through local mills and exporters who aggregate regional coffees, or through one of Hawai‘i’s large commercial producers. The majority of producers are considered small “lifestyle” farms or small commercial farms with sales ranging from $10,000 to $250,000. But when aggregated, Hawai‘i’s nearly 1,000 coffee farms produce one of the state’s most important crops. According to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, coffee is ranked as the second highest value crop in Hawai‘i, just behind seed corn. Hawai‘i’s coffee harvest season runs broadly from August through March. All coffees in Hawai‘i are hand-harvested, except for 4 of the largest farms, one each located on Maui, Kaua‘i, Moloka‘i, and O‘ahu.

One can select among hundreds of farms, several regions and many coffee varieties, often sold direct from the farm - each with distinctive farm practices, styles, and flavor profiles. Buyers can source green coffees direct from farms, through local mills and exporters who aggregate regional coffees, or through one of Hawai‘i’s large commercial producers. The majority of producers are considered small “lifestyle” farms or small commercial farms with sales ranging from $10,000 to $250,000. But when aggregated, Hawai‘i’s nearly 1,000 coffee farms produce one of the state’s most important crops. According to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, coffee is ranked as the second highest value crop in Hawai‘i, just behind seed corn. Hawai‘i’s coffee harvest season runs broadly from August through March. All coffees in Hawai‘i are hand-harvested, except for 4 of the largest farms, one each located on Maui, Kaua‘i, Moloka‘i, and O‘ahu. 6 After harvesting, producers employ a wide variety of processing methods, accounting for the current weather conditions, farm infrastructure, availability of water, and the desired result. Washed coffee is the most common processing method. These are typically dried on patios, raised beds or covered rooftops, and raked frequently for one to three weeks, or until the moisture is low enough to safely store. Semi-washed, pulp(ed)-naturals (“honeys”), and full natural processed coffees are becoming increasingly popular as producers experiment and demonstrate improvements in quality and innovation. On the four mechanically harvested farms, where the weather tends to be dry around harvest time, some cherries are fully dried on the trees prior to harvesting. Unlike most coffee producing origins, Hawai‘i’s coffee growers have several avenues of distribution and can refine 7 their coffees as much as they choose. Many mills serve farmers with an array of equipment including dry mills, graders, gravity tables, optical sorters, and roasters. Farmers choose their level of service, generally informed by whether they’ll sell direct to consumers, to a roaster, or to an exporter. When shopping for Hawaiian coffee, a wide selection can be found: in varieties, region, processing method, and grade. Hawai‘i offers a broad spectrum of unique and distinctive coffees produced exclusively for the specialty coffee palate. With so much variety, it’s hard to define Hawaiian coffee in any singular way. Hundreds of small, independent farms, often with unique and innovative practices, create interesting and distinctive nuances in the cup. Hawai‘i is a legendary place for coffee lovers to “treasure hunt” for their favourite coffee.

Hawaiian coffee is considered rare and revered in the same way Jamaica Blue Mountain coffee is.